Neighborhoods influence health, for better and for worse

first_img Had Ray been born 10 blocks south of East Harlem, in Manhattan’s Upper East Side, his life and death would have been very different. There’s a 10-year difference in life expectancy between residents of the Upper East Side and East Harlem. In other neighborhoods across the country, the gap is even larger. According to the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation a boy born in Bolivar, Miss., can expect to live 67 years. Born the same day in Fairfax, Va., he would expect to live 15 years longer. Such disparities reflect differences in the resources and infrastructures available in different communities. To address these inequities, health care systems must be understood as just one part of the complex, integrated community systems needed to support health.advertisement About the Author Reprints During this chaotic period of health care reform in America, doctors like me are waking up to a reality we have long ignored: To save lives, it simply isn’t enough to provide the best clinical care we can. As we transition from fee-for-service care to population health management, we must do more than “bend the cost curve” and provide health care more efficiently. We must look beyond the walls of our health centers and hospitals and into the communities where people live their daily lives.Rather than focusing on clinical diagnoses and treatments, we need to collaborate with community leaders and organizations providing social services, making ourselves part of the neighborhoods we serve.Many hospitals and clinics are already experimenting with innovative approaches that link the clinic to the neighborhood. Nationally, the 100 Million Healthier Lives network brings together community-based organizations providing everything from mental health supports to transportation assistance to learn from each other about how to successfully collaborate with hospitals to build health in their communities. In Dallas, Parkland Health and Hospital System is developing an electronic data system that lets doctors and social service organizations coordinate care for the people they both serve. Instead of telling a patient to eat more vegetables, a physician can send a note to the food bank across the street, informing the staff of the patient’s dietary needs. In New York, City Health Works matches low-income patients with complex chronic conditions with health coaches who help them find motivation and support systems to navigate daily life. Related: Can a digital health startup prevent diabetes in Medicaid patients? If Ray had been able to work with a health coach, he would have had someone to visit him at home, use behavioral psychology to help him meet his challenges head-on, and use mobile communications technologies to share information with me and other members of his care team about why he struggled to control his diabetes.These programs represent a new generation of collaborative efforts to push back against the premise that the circumstances of a person’s daily life are not the concern of health care providers. As health systems take on financial responsibility for population health, using advances in analytics and mobile technologies to implement adaptable care models will be essential for building healthier communities.That work isn’t easy. But if we truly believe that the neighborhood in which you are born shouldn’t limit your prospects for good health, it is the work we must pursue. If health care providers, community-based professionals and leaders, and policy makers embrace this new spirit of collaborative innovation, it is still possible for Ray’s grandchildren in East Harlem to represent the healthiest generation of Americans we have ever known.Prabhjot Singh, MD, is the director of the Arnhold Institute for Global Health and chair of the Department of Health System Design and Global Health at Mount Sinai Health System, and author of “Dying and Living in the Neighborhood: A Street-Level View of America’s Healthcare Promise” (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2016). “Promise me he won’t die here,” my patient’s daughter begged me. In her eyes was a fear born of familiarity: She’d seen too many of her family and neighbors die in a hospital. Just last year, her mother was admitted to the intensive care unit and never left. Now her 70-year-old father, whom I’ll call Ray, was in the same place, lying in a bed with his eyes unfocused and his speech confused. Ray would die here, and I could do nothing to stop that from happening. His life was never mine to save. It had been lost much earlier to the destructive grind of the impoverished, embattled neighborhood where he lived.Ray lived in East Harlem, N.Y., for a half-century. During that time he saw his neighborhood deteriorate under pressure of failed public policies. Super block public housing isolated poor neighbors — almost all of them black and Latino — from the richer, whiter city around them. The political clout of wealthier neighborhoods unwilling to host drug treatment facilities turned East Harlem into New York City’s methadone capital. Violent crime increased. For decades, Ray couldn’t find work — or safety. Over time, he grew isolated, eating meals of cheap takeout on his couch while watching TV. The salty food and inactivity left him with diabetes, swollen limbs, and ultimately heart failure.His neighborhood helped create the conditions that killed him, and they continue to take their toll on the children and grandchildren Ray left behind.advertisement First OpinionNeighborhoods influence health, for better and for worse The East Harlem neighborhood of New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Imagescenter_img By Prabhjot Singh Sept. 21, 2016 Reprints Tags collaborationcommunity healthhealth care To get more kids health care, train their neighbors to navigate insurance maze But it doesn’t have to be that way in East Harlem or any other neighborhood in America. There are ways to make neighborhoods places where healthy lives are built, not ground down. Prabhjot Singh Related: @prabhjotsinghNY last_img read more

A new troll tactic: tweeting seizure-triggering images at epileptic people

first_img Newsweek writer Kurt Eichenwald has been on the receiving end of lots of hatred for his articles critical of Donald Trump. But after Eichenwald made a contentious appearance on Fox News last week, he says the attacks have taken a new turn — taking aim at his health.Eichenwald told “Good Morning America” Tuesday that because of his criticisms of Donald Trump, supporters of the President-elect have tweeted images at him that have triggered his epileptic seizures.“They knew what they were doing,” Eichenwald said, noting his openness about his epilepsy. The image — a flashing multicolored starburst with the text “You deserve a seizure for your posts” — left him bedridden and unable to drive.advertisement HealthA new troll tactic: tweeting seizure-triggering images at epileptic people Newsweek writer Kurt Eichenwald says that because of his criticisms of Donald Trump, supporters of the president-elect have tweeted images at him that have triggered his epileptic seizures. Charles Eshelman/Getty Images Please enter a valid email address. On behalf of Eichenwald, a Texas judge has now issued a court order for Twitter to help find the account of the person who sent the seizure-inducing tweet. The account, @jew_goldstein, has been suspended.Eichenwald said that a flashing version of this image caused him to have a seizure. Eichenwald told “Good Morning America” that the tweets represent a “sick and twisted” mentality in the country. “It is amazing to me that, simply because I am a political reporter, simply because I write about Donald Trump … people think they have the right and obligation to inflict potentially very serious injury.”advertisement He promised to tweet updates of his legal battle, and tweeted a warning to his attackers: “We are getting your accounts canceled, one at a time. So if u want to stay on twitter, stop.” But how does a tweet cause a seizure? Can it?All sorts of stimuli can trigger seizures. Lack of sleep, sounds (like the voice of a TV show host), alcohol, foods, and hormonal changes are among the culprits for people with epilepsy. But about 3 percent have photosensitive epilepsy. For them, seizures can be caused flickering or flashing lights, the so-called “strobe effect.” A GIF can create this effect as different parts of the image repeatedly alternate rapidly between two bright but widely contrasting colors, such as red and green, black and white, or blue and yellow. Depending on the image, the fast-changing colors can simulate patterns of movement that can also induce seizures.“The brightness or color doesn’t matter as much as the rapid change,” said Duke University Medical Center neurologist Dr. Rod Radtke. “The most prominent provocative frequency is at 15 hertz, or 15 times per second. Most public strobe lights — emergency lights on fire alarms [for example] — operate below that so that they don’t incapacitate people with epilepsy.” Tags neurology Newsletters Sign up for Daily Recap A roundup of STAT’s top stories of the day. Privacy Policy By Leah Samuel Dec. 20, 2016 Reprints Leave this field empty if you’re human: In the brain, the flashing hits the retina, which stimulates the visual cortex in the occipital lobe, setting off a burst of abnormal electrical activity.“We don’t know much more than that,” he added. “We’re not going to enter anybody’s brain to see why it happens or what’s different about their brains at the cellular level. Most of the time, once we find out, we just say, ‘Stay away from flashing lights,’ and that’s it.”Seizures vary in type and intensity. They can look like brief moments of semiconciousness, or “spacing out.” Or they can be full-body convulsions with intense muscle contractions and loss of bodily functions. In between are seizures that consist of repeated purposeless movements or a brief fainting spell. In any case, the loss of physical control means that during an epileptic seizure, people can fall onto the floor or into walls or furniture — even onto subway tracks.On the idea of tweeting or emailing flashing images to people known to have epilepsy, however, Radtke questioned the effectiveness of such an attack.“I’m surprised that you can pull it off on the internet,” he said. “It’s doable, but if you’re looking at your phone, it would have to be awful dang bright to activate the retina.”“Even if you’re looking at a computer screen, it usually takes several seconds of exposure to initiate a seizure,” Radtke said. “So you can avert your eyes and avoid it.”Unfortunately Eichenwald may not be able to avoid it. Thanks to copycat Twitter users, he said, “Now my Twitter feed is dangerous.”last_img read more

The show goes on: Trump attends controversial Dana-Farber fundraiser at Mar-a-Lago

first_img What is it? GET STARTED Log In | Learn More The show goes on: Trump attends controversial Dana-Farber fundraiser at Mar-a-Lago Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Tags hospitalspolicyWhite House President Trump attended Saturday night’s fundraising ball for the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, which was held at Mar-a-Lago — his Florida home and so-called winter White House.While the Harvard-affiliated Boston hospital has held the posh annual event at the private club since 2011, and in 2008, this year’s gala drew criticism from Dana-Farber’s staff and Harvard medical students, who saw Trump’s actions, especially his executive order on immigration, as in direct conflict with the hospital’s mission. Dana-Farber declined to cancel, saying it was too late to change plans, but said it would avoid “controversial venues” in the future. Hospitals STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. What’s included? Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Former Canadian prime minister Brian Mulroney speaks to President Donald Trump at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute fundraiser at Mar-a-Lago Saturday night. Palm Beach Daily News By Ike Swetlitz Feb. 19, 2017 Reprintslast_img read more

As Trump calls for an end to HIV epidemic, CDC reports progress has stalled

first_img As the Trump administration rolls out its plans to stanch the HIV epidemic in the United States, a federal report released Wednesday shows that the gradual declines in HIV infections witnessed in recent years have stalled.The number of new HIV infections has held steady at about 39,000 cases each year since 2013, according to the report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which focused on infections from 2010 to 2016. Before 2013, officials had seen drops in annual case numbers for roughly half a decade.The new report is consistent with data previously shared by federal health officials, but it comes as the administration embarks on its plan to end the country’s HIV epidemic within a decade. President Trump unveiled that effort earlier this month during the State of the Union.advertisement Comparing the Covid-19 vaccines developed by Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson Trending Now: Privacy Policy Andrew Joseph Newsletters Sign up for Daily Recap A roundup of STAT’s top stories of the day. Related: Other groups facing elevated risks of HIV infection include transgender people and people who inject drugs.The report also found:Rates of HIV infections dropped from 2010 to 2016 for blacks, whites, and people of multiple races, but stayed flat for Asians and Latinos. But overall, blacks had the highest infection rate — 49.6 per 100,000 people — which was almost double the rate for the demographic group at second-highest risk, people of multiple races, which had a rate of 26.9 per 100,000 people.In 2016, the rate of infections for men was 23.9 per 100,000 people, but just 5.1 per 100,000 women.The Northeast saw a decline in infections from 2010 to 2016, but the Midwest, South, and West all had similar infection rates over the time period.The CDC estimates that of the roughly 1.1 million people living with HIV in the United States, 15 percent do not know they have the virus. That is why diagnosis and early treatments are key parts of the administration’s new plan: If people know they have the virus, they can start antiretroviral therapies. And if the drugs reduce a person’s viral levels to an undetectable point, that person seems to be unable to spread the virus to another person.Another element of the new effort focuses on expanding the number of people on pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP — a drug that people who are at higher risk of being exposed to HIV can take to dramatically reduce their chances of contracting the virus. But the CDC has said only about one-fifth of the 1.1 million people who should be taking PrEP do so, in part because of cost and insurance issues and in part because doctors do not always offer it. Please enter a valid email address. @DrewQJoseph Although public health researchers and advocates have been largely welcoming of the initiative, some have said that the administration has an uneven track record on HIV policy. Trump, for example, went a year after firing his HIV/AIDS advisory panel before new members were sworn in, and the administration has also turned back health protections for LGBT Americans.Men who have sex with men account for about 70 percent of new HIV infections, the new CDC report said. Among men who have sex with men, infections fell 16 percent from 2010 to 2016 for whites, stayed flat for blacks, and increased 30 percent for Latinos. HealthAs Trump calls for an end to HIV epidemic, CDC reports progress has stalled center_img By Andrew Joseph Feb. 27, 2019 Reprints Leave this field empty if you’re human: The national progress in HIV reduction over the years obscures regional disparities, the persistence of which help explain why the declines have stalled. Cities like San Francisco and New York have aggressively implemented plans similar to the new federal initiative, but such efforts might run into more obstacles in places like the rural South, where stigma and access to care are larger issues.The federal plan takes geography into account. It is targeting its initial efforts at 48 counties, Washington, D.C., and San Juan, Puerto Rico — places where more than 50 percent of new HIV infections are acquired. The initiative is also focused on seven states with HIV challenges in rural areas: Arkansas, Kentucky, Oklahoma, Missouri, Mississippi, Alabama, and South Carolina. Can the U.S. end the HIV epidemic in a decade, as Trump pledged? Tags infectious diseasepolicypublic healthWhite House Packets containing condoms, clean syringes, and other items are available in a vending machine in a poor neighborhood in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Ricardo Arduengo/AP “Together, we will defeat AIDS in America — and beyond,” Trump said. About the Author Reprints [email protected] General Assignment Reporter Andrew covers a range of topics, from addiction to public health to genetics. The plan specifically aims to cut new HIV infections by 75 percent within five years and by at least 90 percent within a decade. Top federal health officials — including CDC Director Robert Redfield and Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases — have outlined steps that include diagnosing people with the virus as early as possible, starting treatment early to suppress the virus, and protecting people from infections.advertisementlast_img read more

Fight for coveted CRISPR patents gets knottier, as MilliporeSigma makes new claims

first_img GET STARTED Tags biotechnologyCRISPRlegalSTAT+ Exclusive By Sharon Begley July 22, 2019 Reprints Fight for coveted CRISPR patents gets knottier, as MilliporeSigma makes new claims Sharon Begley What’s included? What is it? STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Log In | Learn More center_img [email protected] @sxbegle About the Author Reprints Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Kristoffer Tripplaar /Sipa via AP Senior Writer, Science and Discovery (1956-2021) Sharon covered science and discovery. Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. After nearly seven years of failing to win fundamental patents on the genome-editing technology CRISPR, a unit of one of the world’s largest life sciences companies has thrown a Hail Mary: Late last Friday, MilliporeSigma petitioned the U.S. Patent and Trademark office to open an interference proceeding between CRISPR-Cas9 patents that it applied for way back in 2012 and patents that the University of California has applied for or been awarded.The unusual move — New York Law School patent expert Jacob Sherkow’s reaction was “holy s***,” and MilliporeSigma itself described the circumstances as “extraordinary” — seems to be the company’s last-ditch effort to pull out a CRISPR victory at the patent office, which it believes has treated its applications in a way that is inconsistent with how it has treated others.last_img read more

With no dementia cure in sight, it’s time for communities to become dementia friendly

first_img [email protected] Related: @hastingscenter An old idea that’s gaining new traction: curing Alzheimer’s by targeting gum-disease bacteria A Google search turned up dementia-friendly screenings and series at cinemas throughout the United Kingdom, plus tips from the Alzheimer’s Society on how to select films for individuals with dementia and how to accommodate their needs.The “dementia friendly” movement is well-developed in the U.K., as well as in Australia, Ireland, and other aging societies. In addition to making sure that people with dementia and caregivers have a voice in developing dementia programs, U.K.-based efforts like the Dementia Engagement and Empowerment Project (DEEP) engage people with dementia or caregivers as co-investigators in participatory research.advertisement Nancy Berlinger For baby boomers and their parents, there’s no biomedical solution in sight for preventing or curing dementia. That means we need to help people face the prospect of living with dementia and support families affected by it through dementia-friendly policies aligned with their needs.Where should we start? One place is at the movies.While I was in Liverpool this summer for the annual conference of the British Society of Gerontology, I spotted a poster for a monthly series of classic films at a local cinema. Printed inside a big pink circle in the poster’s corner were the words “dementia friendly.” I took a closer look. Tickets were about half the price of the usual discount for older adults, and free to caregivers. Screenings were at midday, with free tea and coffee. There was a 20-minute break halfway through the film. And the series was open to the public.advertisement A caregiver’s advice to wait staff on how to support people who have difficulty processing new information — don’t offer seven daily specials — reflects the compassion, hospitality, and practical wisdom evident in this and other grassroots projects.Dementia-friendly initiatives are not care systems. They do not fix basic problems such as inadequate insurance coverage for services and supports needed by individuals with dementia. In the U.S., out-of-pocket costs are 81% higher for dementia compared to cancer or heart disease, largely because so many services needed for this common age-associated condition are not covered by insurers. These problems, which make a dementia diagnosis even harder to bear, need policy solutions.The absence of effective treatments for dementia means we must look at this increasingly common condition in a new way, centered on the experience of people facing dementia in their lives today, not around what biomedicine may offer in the future. As more and more Americans develop dementia or become dementia caregivers, dementia friendly projects can spark our imaginations about what makes a community a good place to live and show us how to learn from people with dementia and their caregivers as integral members of communities in aging societies.Nancy Berlinger, Ph.D., is a research scholar at The Hastings Center, where she directs the Bioethics for Aging Societies: Informing Policy and Practice project. A group of people with dementia, their caregivers, and officials from a local nursing home talk, drink coffee, and eat cookies at Connections Cafe in Watertown, Wis., as part of a support and social group. Carrie Antlfinger/APcenter_img The maddening saga of how an Alzheimer’s ‘cabal’ thwarted progress toward a cure for decades By Nancy Berlinger Aug. 14, 2019 Reprints About the Author Reprints Tags agingdementia Related: At the gerontology conference, a session on creating a dementia supportive community in rural North Wales was co-presented by a university researcher and a co-researcher living with dementia. The co-researcher noted that he and other participants with cognitive impairments need logistical help (“we don’t do planning”), transportation, and non-stressful arrangements. For example, meetings begin with tea and cake, a familiar form of local hospitality that encourages discussion and social ties among people with dementia, caregivers, researchers, and social service providers. Materials are shared in print ahead of meetings so participants with dementia would not need to process new information quickly or in unfamiliar formats.Co-researchers proved to be the key in explaining the project’s goals to other older adults, and were able to stress that dementia research didn’t just mean doing brain scans. Peer-to-peer outreach led to many voices contributing insights on how to build dementia- friendly community life. The North Wales network now hosts informal meetups; a dinner group for people with early-onset dementia; peer support for people newly diagnosed with dementia; education for police officers and taxi drivers; and a project to collect Welsh-language music recordings familiar to locals from childhood.The U.K.-based National Evaluation of Dementia Friendly Communities, also known as DEMCOM, is conducting a national evaluation of nearly 300 dementia-friendly projects to understand how they help people live well. The study, which includes as co-researchers individuals with dementia and caregivers, has found that dementia friendliness involves far more than “putting up signs” to indicate that a business is dementia friendly or to help people with cognitive impairment navigate public places. Insights from co-researchers suggest that some individuals with dementia who welcome opportunities to socialize in relaxed, supportive environments may not want to call attention to their diagnoses in a supermarket check-out lane marked as “dementia friendly.”In the U.S., some cities, such as Denver, have started education programs to help community members recognize dementia symptoms and learn how to assist people with symptoms such as confusion. The Museum of Modern Art’s Alzheimer’s Project, popularly known as Meet Me at MoMA, is an example of an initiative to make museums more accessible to people with dementia and to dementia caregivers. But what about in everyday life?When I went looking for U.S. examples of the types of projects — local, sociable, accessible, practical — that I’d learned about and observed in the U.K., I often found them in public libraries. Some regularly host Memory Cafes, started in the Netherlands over 20 years ago as dementia-friendly gatherings. Dementia Friendly America, a network launched in 2015 based on a statewide initiative in Minnesota, has worked with AARP’s network of age-friendly communities on recommendations for collaboration between these related but different movements.I learned about a restaurant in Huntington, W.Va., that has started a monthly dementia-friendly night. The restaurant’s managers and another community member, all with family experiences of dementia, brainstormed a welcoming environment for people with dementia and for caregivers. “We know what people with dementia and their caregivers go through,” restaurant co-manager Bradley Tweel told the Washington Post. “We know that they could probably use a night out together, and we wanted to show that we completely understand.” First OpinionWith no dementia cure in sight, it’s time for communities to become dementia friendly last_img read more

Pharmalittle: Buttigieg releases sweeping drug pricing plan; opioid victims to play role in Purdue bankruptcy

first_img Ed Silverman By Ed Silverman Oct. 7, 2019 Reprints Alex Hogan/STAT @Pharmalot Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED About the Author Reprints STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Pharmalot What is it? Tags drug pricingopioidspharmaceuticalspharmalittleSTAT+center_img Pharmalittle: Buttigieg releases sweeping drug pricing plan; opioid victims to play role in Purdue bankruptcy Log In | Learn More Good morning, everyone, and welcome to another working week. We hope the weekend respite was relaxing and invigorating, because that oh-so-predictable routine of deadlines, meetings, Skype calls, and whatever else you do to communicate has, of course, returned. To cope, yes, we are firing up the coffee kettle and quaffing cups of stimulation. After all, the neurons can use a little help. Our choice today is blueberry cobbler for those considering something adventurous. Meanwhile, here are some items of interest to help you on your own journey. Hope all goes well and, by all means, keep in touch. We enjoy hearings spilled secrets …The appointment of a former pharmaceutical lobbyist to the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s top advisory body has outraged recovery advocates, who blame the industry for a nationwide overdose crisis that claimed more than 67,000 lives last year, BuzzFeed News writes. Jessica Hulsey Nickel, 43, heads the Brimley Group lobbying firm and the nonprofit Addiction Policy Forum. From 2014 to 2017, she was a registered lobbyist for Alkermes (ALKS), which makes the Vivitrol addiction treatment that sparked controversy over misleading marketing aimed at judges and jails. Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. [email protected] What’s included? GET STARTEDlast_img read more

Democrats’ drug pricing bill is a sneak peek at the party’s 2020 campaign message

first_img STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. @levfacher Washington Correspondent Lev Facher covers the politics of health and life sciences. Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) Mark Wilson/Getty Images Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Lev Facher Log In | Learn More What is it? What’s included? Politics center_img By Lev Facher Dec. 11, 2019 Reprints About the Author Reprints Democrats’ drug pricing bill is a sneak peek at the party’s 2020 campaign message GET STARTED Tags advocacycampaignsCongressdrug pricingpolicy [email protected] WASHINGTON — If Democrats are spoiling for a 2020 fight focused on anything besides impeaching President Trump, consider this week’s vote on a massive drug pricing package their opening salvo.House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s Lower Drug Costs Now Act, a sweeping bill that pledges to lower consumer drug costs by 50%, includes ideas long touted by progressives in Washington: It would let Medicare directly negotiate the price of at least 50 drugs per year and it would cap U.S. drug payments based on costs in other developed countries. Unlock this article — plus daily intelligence on Capitol Hill and the life sciences industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTEDlast_img read more

Pharmalittle: FDA gives states an OK to authorize coronavirus tests; more companies race to combat Covid-19

first_imgPharmalot Tags pharmalittleSTAT+ Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Alex Hogan/STAT About the Author Reprints What’s included? Log In | Learn More Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. By Ed Silverman March 17, 2020 Reprintscenter_img Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. What is it? Good morning, everyone, and how are you today? We are doing just fine, thank you, despite the sudden changes in life occurring everywhere. We are ensconced in our usual corner of the Pharmalot campus, where the short person is learning online and the street noise that usually wafts in through the windows has evaporated. Such is the new reality. Nonetheless, there is much to be done. So on that note, here are a few tidbits to help you focus. Hope your day goes well and that you remain healthy.In response to a dire shortage of tests for detecting the novel coronavirus, the FDA gave states new powers to authorize labs to develop their own diagnostics, and it also approved new tests that will be distributed by LabCorp (LH) and Hologic (HOLX), STAT says. The agency will allow states to take responsibility for tests developed and used by laboratories within their borders, a step that is similar to what the FDA last week granted to the New York State Department of Health. The labs will not have to pursue an emergency clearance that is normally required. @Pharmalot Pharmalittle: FDA gives states an OK to authorize coronavirus tests; more companies race to combat Covid-19 GET STARTED [email protected] Ed Silvermanlast_img read more

Seeking EU approval on acquisition, Google pledges not to use Fitbit health data to target ads

first_imgHealth Tech Seeking EU approval on acquisition, Google pledges not to use Fitbit health data to target ads @erbrod Tags financemedical technologySTAT+ Log In | Learn More By Erin Brodwin July 14, 2020 Reprints GET STARTED About the Author Reprints Unlock this article — and get additional analysis of the technologies disrupting health care — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. David Ramos/Getty Images Health Tech Correspondent, San Francisco Erin is a California-based health tech reporter and the co-author of the STAT Health Tech newsletter. STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. With the clock ticking on a European Commission probe into Google’s $2.1 billion bid for Fitbit, the tech giant offered regulators a concession late Monday, agreeing not to use Fitbit’s trove of health data to help target ads.Google had been staring down the possibility of a sweeping antitrust investigation by European regulators that was the latest in a series of probes into its deal with Fitbit announced last November. But the tech giant had a potential way to avoid the full thrust of the investigation: A promise, in the form of a binding pledge, not to use Fitbit’s fitness data for ad-targeting. Regulators gave the company until Monday to offer such a statement. Google complied late that day, Reuters reported. What is it? What’s included? Erin Brodwin [email protected] linkedin.com/in/erinbrodwin/ last_img read more