Olympic Athletes, Officials Recall The 1996 Atlanta Games

first_img TOM STRICKLAND / Associated Press American swimmer Janet Evans looks on as Muhammad Ali lights the Olympic flame during the 1996 Summer Olympic Games opening ceremony in Atlanta Friday, July 19, 1996. (AP Photo/Michael Probst) DENIS PAQUIN / Associated Press ERIC DRAPER / Associated Press ERIC DRAPER / Associated Press Women’s gold medal basketball team members listen to the national anthem during medal ceremonies for women’s basketball at the Centennial Summer Olympic Games in Atlanta Sunday, August 4, 1996. Team members from left are: Teresa Edwards, Dawn Staley, Ruthie Bolton, and Sheryl Swoopes. The United States defeated Brazil 111-87. (AP Photo/ Eric Draper) American swimmer Janet Evans looks on as Muhammad Ali lights the Olympic flame during the 1996 Summer Olympic Games opening ceremony in Atlanta Friday, July 19, 1996. (AP Photo/Michael Probst) Add to My List In My List For Whom The Bell Rings Carl Lewis of the United States takes his third jump during the men’s long jump final at the 1996 Summer Olympic Games in Atlanta, Monday, July 29, 1996. Lewis won the gold medal. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky) TOM STRICKLAND / Associated Press ‘It’s Fractured’: Georgia Lt. Gov. Geoff Duncan On Healing Republican Party WABE.ORG / PBA Legal Advocate Discusses Medical Abuse At Shut Down Georgia ICE Facility Vice President Al Gore, left, along with Billy Payne, right, CEO of the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (ACOG), and co-chair of the ACOG Andrew Young, standing at center, watch a video at the White House, Aug. 2, 1995, during a meeting of the White House Task Force on the Olympic Games. (AP Photo/Denis Paquin) Amy Van Dyken of Englewood, Colo., breaks into a smile during the medals ceremony after winning the 200-meter butterfly Tuesday, March 12, 1996, at the U.S. Olympic Swim Trials in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/Tom Strickland) WABE.ORG / PBA LYNNE SLADKY / Associated Press DENIS PAQUIN / Associated Press WABE.ORG / PBA Share MICHAEL PROBST / Associated Press LYNNE SLADKY / Associated Press Women’s gold medal basketball team members listen to the national anthem during medal ceremonies for women’s basketball at the Centennial Summer Olympic Games in Atlanta Sunday, August 4, 1996. Team members from left are: Teresa Edwards, Dawn Staley, Ruthie Bolton, and Sheryl Swoopes. The United States defeated Brazil 111-87. (AP Photo/ Eric Draper) Amy Van Dyken of Englewood, Colo., breaks into a smile during the medals ceremony after winning the 200-meter butterfly Tuesday, March 12, 1996, at the U.S. Olympic Swim Trials in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/Tom Strickland) This story is part of “Atlanta Remembers: The 1996 Olympics,” WABE’s series on the impact of the 1996 Summer Olympics on Atlanta, 20 years later. For more stories, click here.Twenty years ago, athletes from all over the world came to Atlanta to compete in the 1996 Summer Olympic Games.On Saturday, some of those athletes and Atlanta officials remembered what it was like to be in the midst of the games that put Atlanta on the map as a globally recognized city.Ambassador Andrew Young recalled his time with Muhammad Ali before the games, but he said another moment was his favorite memory of the Olympics.It was a brilliant move on Billy’s part. He thought of that all by himself. It was not my suggestion. And what I remember was when we had Muhammad come to town, we wanted to keep it secret, but he didn’t want to stay quiet. He wanted to go get a haircut, he went to the fish restaurant. He was all over town and I was with him. But nobody knew why he was here. He was just Muhammad Ali, being Muhammad Ali. So I was glad when it came time for him to actually mount the stage for the lighting of the torch, but that was not my memory of that day. My memory for that evening was that when the athletes marched in to the stadium, Israel, Iran and Iraq marched in together. And that’s what the Olympics was about for me. The Olympics was about the possibility that the world can live together peacefully and prosperously.The ‘Father’ Of Atlanta’s 1996 Olympic Games Looks BackOlympic women’s basketball star and five-time Olympic medal winner Teresa Edwards also looked back on seeing Muhammad Ali light the 1996 Olympic torch.I was the actual athlete who recited the athlete’s oath at the opening ceremony right here in Atlanta on July 19, my birthday. Everything was perfectly aligned for me. When Muhammad Ali came around the corner with the torch, or came onto the track, let me tell you something, everything in me, I lost control. Because I was down at the ground waiting my turn to go up, you know I didn’t know, But when I saw that, I screamed at the top of my lungs, I’m jumping up and down. I’m noticing that I’m around all the other countries and the excitement. I’ll never forget how he lit that entire stadium up. Anyone who was in that stadium will never forget what they felt, how he lit that up.World-record-setting track and field runner Carl Lewis won the gold for the men’s long jump in 1996, making the win his fourth consecutive win in that category, but that historic moment may not have happened had the games not been in Atlanta, a place the 10-time Olympic medal winner thinks of as a second home. First of all I had a place here, so I always felt kind of a part of Atlanta and I had so many relatives. I was born in Birmingham and my mother is from Gasden, so I had a lot of people here. That was my memory. It was like family, like home for me. That’s what the games were like and honestly if this games had been in another country I would not have gone. I would have stopped. There’s no way I would have done it, and it ended up being one that’s close to my heart.The 1996 Summer Paralympics made its first fully corporate-sponsored debut in Atlanta. The Shepherd Center, a hospital that specializes in brain and spinal injuries, played a major role in bringing the Paralympics to Atlanta, COO James Shepherd told WABE at the reunion celebration.“It meant a lot to have Atlanta be an international city and host the games together,” Shepherd said. “We’re very proud of that. We’re as proud of that as we are of anything we’ve done in our history.”  The 1996 games helped elevate the Paralympic Games to household name status, Paralympic track and field gold medalist Al Mead said. Atlantans Remember The 1996 Summer Olympic GamesRecalling his watching the games in 1996, Shepherd retold one moment that stood out in his mind: Probably one of the standouts was watching Tony Volpentest, a quadruple congenital amputee, turn a 100-meter time with about 11-something seconds. It was about a second and a half off Carl Lewis’ time. It was special. It brought visibility to elite athletes. Aside from swimmer Amy Van Dyken’s four gold medal wins, which made her the most-awarded athlete in the 1996 Olympics, her fondest memories were that of friendship. So we had a teammate, her name was Amanda Beard. She was 14 years old, just a little munchkin. And she came in when we were done swimming and she said, ‘Amy I want you to come with me because I want to get a tattoo.’ I’m like ‘OK I’ll come with you.” But she goes, ‘But you have to pretend to be my mom.’ I was like ‘Uh, that’s not going to work, Amanda.’ Just things like that. I remember that there was a picture that USA Today had and it was of me and Franziska Van Almsick from Germany and no one else was around. It was just her and I hugging. That was what the Olympics were all about always. That was another good memory. Van Dyken also said she holds a special place in her heart for Atlanta because “… my life changed forever in this place over the course of five days, over the course of five swims. I walked in here, no one knew who I was and I left as the most decorated athlete of these games, like, it is cool …”Olympic swimmer Janet Evans, who was given the distinction of carrying to Olympic torch to Muhammad Ali during the 1996 games, expressed her sentiments for Atlanta and the 20-year reunion. For me it’s wonderful to see my friends and see the people that really brought the games to Atlanta and changed the city for the better and made it, what I believe, partly what it is today. … I think it put Atlanta on the map. I think it was a rejuvenation for the South. I think when you have someone like Muhammad Ali lighting the Olympic caldron, and it just proves what an amazing city this is, that the South can bring so much to the United States and the global environment as a whole. We want to know about your favorite Olympic moments. Tell us about them in the comment section below.  MICHAEL PROBST / Associated Press Related Stories Vice President Al Gore, left, along with Billy Payne, right, CEO of the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (ACOG), and co-chair of the ACOG Andrew Young, standing at center, watch a video at the White House, Aug. 2, 1995, during a meeting of the White House Task Force on the Olympic Games. (AP Photo/Denis Paquin) 123456 Carl Lewis of the United States takes his third jump during the men’s long jump final at the 1996 Summer Olympic Games in Atlanta, Monday, July 29, 1996. Lewis won the gold medal. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)last_img read more

Big on Bitcoin: Caruso now largest real estate firm to accept rent in cryptocurrency

first_imgRick Caruso (Getty, iStock)Rick Caruso’s eponymous real estate firm is embracing cryptocurrency.The Fairfax-based investment company will begin accepting rent payments in Bitcoin across its retail and commercial properties, according to the Los Angeles Times.The firm also said it spent 1 percent of its cash reserves on Bitcoin and entered a partnership with Gemini, a cryptocurrency exchange led by Tyler Winklevoss.“We’ve allocated a percentage of what would normally go into the capital markets into Bitcoin,” Caruso said, in an interview with CNBC.The move makes Caruso the largest real estate operator in the U.S. to accept Bitcoin for rent payments, according to Coindesk. The company’s Southern California holdings include the Grove mall, Miramar Beach Resort and the 240-unit Americana at Brand luxury rental complex.How many tenants will choose to pay in that currency remains to be seen. Its value fluctuates sharply — in the last three months a Bitcoin was worth between $30,000 and $60,000. As an example: A year ago, one Bitcoin traded below $5,000. Today, it’s worth more than 10 times that price.Caruso isn’t the only investor to move into cryptocurrency. Morgan Stanley opened up access to Bitcoin for its wealth management clients earlier this year. And Goldman Sachs is expected to offer clients cryptocurrency investment vehicles in the near future.Bitcoin is sometimes accepted in smaller real estate deals. In January, a New York City bar owner listed two properties that could be purchased in Bitcoin. And the owner of Miami Beach’s Treehouse nightclub listed the property in March, with cryptocurrency or cash accepted.In February, Rick Caruso listed his Malibu mansion for sale. He listed the 7,200-square-foot home for $40 million in February, or roughly 693 bitcoin today; no word if he’ll accept the currency as payment.[LAT] [CNBC] — Dennis Lynchlast_img read more

Condor Bikes Overhauls Road, Cross Bikes For 2011

first_imgLondon-based Condor Bikes is rolling out their 2011 line, with some major revisions to some of their road and cross models, while the company takes a “if it’s not broken, don’t fix it’ approach to the rest of the line. See what Condor has been up to after the break.ItaliaAt just £999.99 for a complete build, the Italia is quite the bargain. Race it, commute with it, or just enjoy the open road. The 7003 aluminum frame has some cool features, including a curved top tube and internal cable routing. The Italia comes with a Deda Nero carbon fork, built up with SRAM Apex components and a Deda alloy cockpit.SquadraCondor is aiming to break into the higher end road market with the Squadra, redesigned for 2011 with an all carbon frame, taking design cues from Condor’s popular Leggero race bike. The Squadra gets a tapering headtube, internal cable routing, and a Deda 5.6 oversize carbon fork to keep things stiff and comfortable on the front end. Pictures aren’t available for this model yet, but we do know it will retail at £799.99 for the frame, fork and headset, and will be offered in black/white and yellow/white color combos.Baracchi“The Baracchi has one aim, which is to make your long ride not only smooth, but also fast.” says Condor. The carbon frame gets updated internal cable routing this year, as well as a new, lighter “wave” fork which Condor says makes the Baracchi much more attractive for climbing. Complete builds start at £1,799.99, with an offering for the frame, fork, and headset for £1,399.99.Terra-XThe Terra-X was designed with the serious ‘cross racer in mind. Dedacciai EM2 Scandium tubing makes up the frame, which now features a curved top tube for better shouldering and more clearance. Condor also designed a ‘cross specific straight blade fork for the Terra-X, which features the increasingly popular tapered steerer tube.The Terra-X will come in the brown/blue combo pictured above, as well as a “limited edition team” color combo. Retail for the frameset is £799.99, and Condor isn’t offering these as complete builds.Most of these models are available now on Condor’s website, which also features an option to build any of the bikes with custom spec’s via their online bike builder.last_img read more

EXG finds a way

first_imgEXG explained that with many regular heavy lift liner services suspended between India and Europe due to falling project cargo volumes, there were limited available sailings between the two ports that fitted within the stipulated laycan time frames.As a result, EXG chose to load the oversize cargo onto a container vessel. This meant that the company had to keep to the container line’s fixed schedule, while also meeting the tight delivery deadline of its client.www.expressworld.comwww.wwpc.eu.comlast_img

Bondi controversy in accepting Trump’s $25,000

first_imgBondi claims no wrong doing in accepting Trump’s $25,000 campaign donationIn recent weeks Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi has become embroiled in the 2016 presidential election campaign.Earlier this month, Florida Democratic Party Chair Allison Tant filed an elections complaint with the Florida Elections Commission against Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, claiming he made an illegal donation of $25,000 to Bondi. The lawsuit alleged Bondi personally solicited Trump for a donation during her 2013 campaign for attorney general and the Donald J. Trump Foundation donated $25,000 to Bondi in violation of IRScode. When Bondi attempted to return the donation, the Foundation refused to accept the check, but Trump reimbursed the Foundation $25,000, in violation of Section 106.08(5)(a), Florida Statutes.It’s also alleged at the time Bondi requested and Trump made the donation, the attorney general’s office was reviewing complaints of fraud brought against Trump University operated by Donald Trump.Last week, at a press conference Bondi did not deny accepting the donation. She said when she accepted it her office was not investigating the university. Bondi, a declared supporter of Trump’s run for president, said when she accepted the donation, “I just knew there was nothing improper.”Bondi was originally elected attorney general in 2010.  Prior to her taking office in 2011 several Florida residents complained to the state about fraudulent practices of Trump University founded in 2005, offering courses in real estate, asset management, entrepreneurship, and wealth creation. Bondi said her office received three complaints since she took office, one before the $25,000 donation and two after.There are allegations and calls by Bondi’s critics for her to resign because it’s implied she gave Trump a pass on investigating the claims against the university in exchange for the money. However, Bondi said she “would never, ever trade any campaign donation for some type of favor to anyone.”Bondi said she solicited donations from Trump and several people during her 2013 reelection campaign.  However, when Trump made the $25,000 donation he was the subject of a $40 million lawsuit filed by New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman.Trump also hosted a fundraiser for Bondi at his Mar-a-Lago resort in Palm Beach in March 2014, after it is alleged she was aware of the lawsuit against the university.During the press conference Bondi said she hoped her credibility hasn’t been damaged because of the controversy, and insisted she wouldn’t be resigning from office.Bondi whose term as attorney general ends in November 2018, has indicated she will be out of politics when this time comes.last_img read more

Photo shows teacher with 15-year-old student he allegedly kidnapped

first_imgThe Tennessee Bureau of Investigation(CULLEOKA, Tenn.) — A former teacher accused of kidnapping his 15-year-old student researched “teen marriage” online eight days before he allegedly abducted the girl, authorities said today.The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation said the suspect, Tad Cummins, 50, also did online research about his car “to determine if certain features could be tracked by law enforcement.”Cummins is accused of kidnapping Elizabeth Thomas on March 13 and was fired from his job the next day. An Amber Alert has been issued for Thomas, and Cummins is wanted on allegations of aggravated kidnapping and sexual contact with a minor.“We need you home,” Thomas’s sister, Sarah, told ABC News today. “Whatever he’s telling you is a lie. .. just call or text us whenever you can.”Amid the desperate search for the victim, the TBI released a photo today showing Thomas and Cummins together in their Culleoka school in January. The photo was taken days before Cummins had “alleged inappropriate contact with her,” the TBI said.One of Thomas’s schoolmates had reported seeing them kiss in his classroom on Jan. 23, according to a school district investigative report, but Thomas and Cummins denied the claim.The TBI said that Cummins “may have been abusing his role as a teacher to groom [the teen] … in an effort to lure and potentially sexually exploit her.”Thomas’s sister told ABC News that the victim was bullied in school by students and teachers after the reported kiss and told her “I just have to get away, we have to get away.”“I can’t handle this anymore . .. all the teachers, all the kids constantly saying mean things, I can’t handle it,’” the sister recounted.Sarah Thomas said her sister woke her up urgently the day she disappeared and made her promise to call the police if she was not home by 6 p.m. that night. Sarah Thomas said her sister sounded “serious,” not happy. “She’s not a serious person.”When the 15-year-old didn’t come home, Sarah Thomas was scared.“I felt like it was my fault,” she told ABC News. “Maybe if I would have done something” that morning, and didn’t fall back asleep, “I could’ve stopped her,” she said.But Sarah Thomas said she doesn’t think Elizabeth Thomas knew she was leaving that day; she said her sister wouldn’t leave without at least hugging her.“If she gets sick, he can’t do anything … she doesn’t have a way of getting to the doctor,” Sarah Thomas said.She also said her younger sister is “not a camper.” She hates the woods and is scared of snakes and spiders, Sarah Thomas said.An attorney for the school district has not responded to ABC News’ request for comment about the bullying claims.As authorities search for the pair, authorities say Cummins is believed to be armed and that the teen is “in imminent danger.”Authorities said neither Thomas nor Cummins has been in touch with family members.TBI spokesman Josh DeVine told ABC News about 600 tips have come in as of today, which he called “substantially low.” And there are still no credible sightings of the duo, which DeVine says is very rare.Join us in holding out hope. It only takes one solid lead. pic.twitter.com/VShoOaUksX— TBI (@TBInvestigation) March 21, 2017Cummins’ wife, Jill, pleaded with her husband Friday to “come home.” “I had no idea my husband was involved with anything that has led to all this. My heart breaks for the family of Beth Thomas,” she said. “Tad, this is not you. This is not who you are. We can help you get through this … Your family wants their poppy back. Please do the right thing and turn yourself into the police and bring Beth home.”In an interview with ABC News Monday, the teen’s father, Anthony Thomas, pleaded with his daughter to “please let us know you are all right and please come home to us.”It’s been a week, but we’re not giving up hope. Stay vigilant, stay alert, and let us know if you spot these individuals or this vehicle. pic.twitter.com/jDACuW1iUg— TBI (@TBInvestigation) March 20, 2017Thomas family attorney Jason Whatley told ABC News that Cummins was “taking advantage” of his student and “manipulating her into leaving with him.”“We are very concerned about the control that he has over her,” Whatley said. “We believe that is 100 percent the reason why she is missing at this point. He is the problem, she is not. She’s a child, she’s a victim.”Cummins is described as 6 feet tall and weighs about 200 pounds. He may be driving a 2015 silver Nissan Rogue with a Tennessee license plate number 976-ZPT.Thomas is described as 5-foot-5 and weighs 120 pounds. She was last seen wearing leggings and a flannel shirt.Authorities are asking that anyone with information call 1-800-TBI-FIND and that anyone who sees a car with a Tennessee license plate 976-ZPT call 911. A $1,000 reward is available for information leading to Cummins’ arrest.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.Powered by WPeMatico Relatedlast_img read more